Writing is writing is writing …

I finished Chapter Three of “The Illustrious Client” day before yesterday, so yesterday I began rewriting a play that I gave up on awhile ago. Recently I received an email from a friend who produced a series every year called “Pulp Diction” and he is looking for new material. Last year I submitted a couple of plays that I hoped would meet his criteria, but in the end his peeps didn’t find them quite “pulpy” enough. This year he suggested I take something I had completely given up on and “pulpify” it. I could think of only one thing, and that is my play called “Just Like Tennessee.” It’s a play about Tennessee Williams. Sort of. Originally, it was a one man show for a specific actor. Things happened and that didn’t come to fruition, after a staged reading. I decided to open the play up and write it for more characters, still referencing TW. Now my main character is a young actor, Bo Young, who is 20, gay, and busy playing Tom in “The Glass Menagerie.” He’s also addicted to meth, in love with his director, but heartbroken because the director has dumped him. Then his father comes to town about the same time that Bo tries to kill himself. It’s sometimes hard to distinguish Bo’s fever dream from Bo’s reality, but I’m hoping that just for Bo, and that the audience will be able to easily tell what is “real.” The problem with the play when I abandoned it (I see now) is that the play weenied out at the end. Instead of rising action and high stakes, we had a melting feel good ending. Phooey. Totally the wrong way to go with this play. Time for pulpification! Heightened action! Sensationalist subject matter! Give these actors something to sink their teeth into. Audiences something to applaud! All right. Back to work.

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3 thoughts on “Writing is writing is writing …

  1. Hi Sandra,
    I am passing the Beautiful Blog award to you. Have fun with it. You can pick up a copy of the web badge and the rules on my blog. You’ll see it pass through Triberr any minute now.
    Sabrina

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